top of page

Artie Lange



Arthur Steven "Artie" Lange Jr. (born October 11, 1967) is an American comedian best known for his tenures on The Howard Stern Show and the sketch comedy series Mad TV. Born and raised in New Jersey, Lange first worked as a longshoreman and taxi driver to help support his family following the death of his quadriplegic father. In 1987, he made his debut as a stand up comic and took up the profession full-time in the early 1990s, performing in clubs and improv shows in and around New York City.


In 1995, Lange moved to Los Angeles to star in the first season of Mad TV. His arrest for cocaine possession during the second season led to his departure and subsequent rehabilitation. In 1997, Norm Macdonald chose Lange to co-star in his comedy film Dirty Work (1998), which secured Lange several film and television roles including Macdonald's sitcom, The Norm Show. In 2001, Lange returned to New Jersey and became a member of The Howard Stern Show until December 2009. He pursued various projects during this time; he released two comedy albums, co-wrote, produced, and starred in his feature film, Artie Lange's Beer League (2006), and released his first book, Too Fat to Fish (2008), which entered The New York Times Best Seller list at number one.


In 2011, Lange completed rehabilitation and resumed his career. He co-hosted The Nick & Artie Show with Nick Di Paolo until Di Paolo's departure in 2013; the show was renamed The Artie Lange Show and lasted until 2014. During this time, Lange released his second book, Crash and Burn (2013). He hosted the podcast The Artie Quitter Podcast from 2015 to 2017, and his third book, Wanna Bet?, was released July 17, 2018. Lange was co-host of The Artie and Anthony Show with Anthony Cumia in 2017 and 2018 and continues to perform stand-up and act, most recently in the HBO series Crashing.

56 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comedy as controlling language

According to cultural analyst Susan Purdie, the true aim of humor is to regulate language and meaning. When comedians command a podium, they assume a position of power. In civic society, this mantle,

Comedy should punch up rather than kick down

Rich Vos, an American comedian, recently threw racist "jokes" at female Indigenous guests at a Winnipeg comedy club, as though he hoped the ladies would be arrested for driving under the influence on

Comedy for survival

Being what the great Ojibway writer Drew Hayden Taylor refers to as "a person of pallor" — white — I can't understand the historical and current anguish that Indigenous people have endured as a result

留言


bottom of page